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Fathom Information Design
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Coding the Body
If you’re in New York City between now and May 10, stop by the TriBeCa art space, apexart to see the latest Coding the Body exhibit. Organized by friend and former M.I.T. Media Lab professor Leah Buechley, “Coding the Body interrogates the relationship between human and code. It explores how code is being used to understand, control, decorate, and replicate us.” At a time when our lives are increasingly defined by codes—whether written by genetics, religion, or software—Leah's exhibit explores the fascinating, enchanting, and occasionally unnerving relationships that  develop between humans and code.
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Robin Hood Poverty Tracker
When Robin Hood first came to us with the intent of visually representing poverty and disadvantage in New York City, we were fascinated to learn that our understanding of poverty was based off of an outdated and inaccurate federal measurement. The Poverty Tracker, Robin Hood’s latest initiative, measures financial poverty, material hardship, and health challenges to give a more accurate depiction of what it means to be poor in New York City. In the analysis, construction, and design of this project, we felt it particularly important to remind ourselves throughout the process that we were looking at people—not numbers.
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Quantitatively measuring correlations
As I mentioned in my previous post, our collaboration with the Sabeti Lab is aimed at creating new visual exploration tools to help researchers, doctors, and clinicians discover patterns and associations in large health and epidemiological datasets. These tools will be the first step in a hypothesis-generation process, combining intuition from expert users with visualization techniques and automated algorithms, allowing users to quickly test hypothesis that are “suggested” by the data itself. Researchers and doctors have a deep familiarity with their data and often can tell immediately when a new pattern is potentially interesting or simply the result of noise. Visualization techniques will help articulate their knowledge to a wider audience. This time around I will describe a quantitative measure of statistical independence called mutual information, which is used to rank associations in the data.
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Searching for Spring
Today is March 20, the official first day of spring, and it almost feels like it. This winter in New England has seemed like one of the toughest in years. The cold and snow have been absolutely relentless, and I think everyone is sick of hearing about the Polar Vortex.
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Game on!
Data, in its multiple forms, can range from the very abstract to the most tangible. We tend to be type-agnostic, but recently a particularly clear set of data caught our eye: real-time position tracking for sports events.
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