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Fathom Information Design
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Introducing: the Nora Explora
She has written over 200 books, over 100 of which were New York Times best sellers, has an astounding 280 million books in print, and is credited with bringing romance novels into the modern age — filling their interiors with capable and intelligent women, and filling their covers with a notable lack of, well, you know.
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Little Nemo in Slumberland
We left our posts at the Fathom offices just as the MBTA suspended service and a statewide driving ban went into effect — but not before setting up a camera and a tripod in the window to keep watch over our fair city as Nor'Easter Nemo arrived.
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One big happy (TV) family
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The Emotional Life of Books
At the Remediating the Social conference a couple of weeks ago, Israeli artist Romy Achituv presented a data visualization project of the books in the Garden Library for Refugees and Migrant Workers in South Tel-Aviv. A unique element of this library is the use of emotional judgments from the readers to organize the books. This project resulted from a collaboration between Romy and me, where the main goal was to create a working prototype of a Web-based visualization of the "emotional history" of the books.
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That's green, well maybe more blueish. You mean Grue?
During my senior year at Savannah College of Art and Design, I took Language, Culture and Society with Désiré Houngues. Two cultural insights about language stuck with me. In some societies men and women speak with entirely different vocabularies but still communicate verbally with one another. The second was that some languages only have two words for color, white and black (light and dark); if a language includes a third color, it is always red. This led me to research by Brent Berlin, an anthropologist, and Paul Kay, a linguist. They made the first hypothesis about how color terms enter a language in a certain order. Later, I came across the World Color Survey, which was established in an effort to continue research into Berlin and Kay's hypothesis. The WCS makes their data available to the public, and I found that this was exactly what I needed to help answer my many questions. The result of the WCS data exploration is below, where about 800,000 individual color chips are grouped by the terms used to describe them.
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